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girl-run

By Jennifer Narloch, April 11, 2013

Consumer interest and demand for high-protein nutritional products has seen rapid growth in the last 5 years. Helping to pave the way, the Greek Yogurt revolution has changed how consumers view and seek out protein in order to keep a balanced diet. Previous to the Greek boom, if you wanted a high-protein breakfast, you had supplemental options, like bars and powders, with very few food options. Fast forward five years; you have your gold standard supplement options and now additionally, you can find familiar foods that line your grocer’s aisles and shelves, now offering high-protein fortified options.

In a market with this much room for growth and development of mature product categories, there is enormous opportunity to grow and develop existing brands. Leading us to our topic of discussion; how can you take advantage of milk protein and whey protein in your line?

Whey comes from cheese making and in the simplest terms, you have milk then cheese, then whey. Your end product is 100% whey. Milk protein comes directly from milk, yielding a powder that is approximately 80% casein and 20% whey.

Whey protein digests faster and more readily than any other protein. It is heat stable up to 160 degrees Fahrenheit, making it best suited for powdered and bar applications. Fat content is customizable to fit any formula. Its advantages are in fitness sectors, supporting muscle repair and growth to tone or bulk up and thermogenesis, aka fat burning and metabolism, to slim down. Recently, whey protein has also been shown to help support healthy insulin levels1. This is new and huge! Not only do sports nutrition and healthy markets benefit from whey protein, now does the market opposite, the sedentary market.  Boost fat and blood sugar metabolism, while slurping something smooth and delicious all from my couch… where do I sign up?

Now introduce milk protein. It’s a complete protein that with, MSG’s technology also has fat adjustability. Different than whey protein, milk protein yields slower digestion in the stomach. These characteristics together, make it excellent for meal replacement and fortification. The slower digestion boosts satiety, helping support lower calorie intake, thus supporting healthy diet and weight. Additionally, milk protein can withstand higher temperature manipulation, which is what has made it the golden ticket for the Greek yogurt industry. Milk protein fortification will work in many food systems that require temperature treatment for processing or stability. In addition to adding grams of protein to your label, it also can work as a thickener for more viscous applications, like RTD smoothies, desserts and sauces. High-protein chocolate bar vs. chocolate protein bar – yes, please! Milk protein can also be a great fit if you need high-quality protein on a lower formula budget.

Milk Specialties Global has taken advantage of the latest filtration technology for both milk and whey, using micro-, ultra- and nano filtration. This yields complete proteins that taste super clean and effortlessly adapt to any flavor system. Metabolism can increase by 30% for as long as 12 hours from a high-protein meal2. That is the calorie-burning equivalent of a 3-4 mile jog! How does that sound to your customers?

1. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms by which dietary whey protein may combat obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Jakubowicz D, Froy O. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms by which dietary whey protein may combat obesity and Type 2 diabetes. J Nutr Biochem. 2013 January 24(1):1-5. Diabetes Unit E. Wolfson Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Holon 58100, Israel.

2. Polson DA, Thompson MP. Macronutrient composition of the diet differentially affects letpin and adiponutrin mRNA expression in response to meal feeding. J Nutr Biochem. 2004 Apr; 15(4):242-6